Guardianship


Guardianship gives a court-appointed individual or entity, known as the guardian, the ability to make legal decisions for an individual who is found to be incapacitated. Both adults and minors (those under age 18), as well as missing persons, may be considered incapacitated. The court can rule that a person is incapacitated when he/she is unable to make informed decisions and cannot:

  • Provide food, clothing or shelter for themselves,
  • Care for their own physical health, or
  • Manage their financial matters.

What steps do we take in preparing guardianship of an adult?

  • First, we schedule an initial meeting, where we will review initial information to prepare your legal filing.
  • Second, if there are two petitioners, there must be a doctor’s evaluation scheduled, which will take place shortly after the court filing. If there is one petitioner, there must be two separate doctor evaluations scheduled before the court filing. The first evaluation occurs immediately before the court filing. The second evaluation is performed by a different doctor and occurs shortly after the petition is filed.
  • Third, we file the petition with the Clerk of Court. All necessary parties are served papers by the Court.
  • Finally, a court hearing is held, with a ruling made on the guardianship in question.

What steps do we take in preparing guardianship of a child?

  • First, we schedule an initial meeting, where we will review initial information to prepare your legal filing.
  • Second, both parents sign acknowledgment and agreement to the guardianship.
  • Third, we file the petition with the Clerk of Court.
  • Finally, a court hearing is held, with a ruling made on the guardianship in question.

The service fee for establishing guardianship is $1,000 and includes all additional fees and court costs.

To get started, please download and complete the following form. You may then email or bring the completed form in person.

Guardianship Information Form ➣